Archive for Technology

Getting Your Money’s Worth Out of Energy Efficiency Webinar

You know implementing energy efficiency projects can produce cash flow and grow your business, but did you know these same energy efficiency projects are also eligible for federal tax incentives?

Event: Webinar: Getting Your Money’s Worth Out of Energy Efficiency
Date: September 30, 2013
Time: 1:00–2:00 EDT / 12:00–1:00 CDT
Admission: Free


Please join the Tennessee Energy Education Initiative for a webinar on monetizing energy efficiency projects and taking advantage of tax incentives. This is valuable knowledge for CFOs, financial advisors, and other key decision makers in organizations seeking to improve bottom lines through energy efficiency initiatives.

Here’s what you can expect:
• Monetizing Energy Solutions: The Road to Funding
Christopher Russell, Visiting Fellow, American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy; Principal, Energy Pathfinder Management Consulting LLC.
• Guide to Tax Incentives for Commercial Business
CJ Aberin, CCSP, shareholder at KBKG, a specialty tax firm focused on securing energy tax incentives, will summarize the benefits of the Energy-Efficient Commercial Buildings (179D) federal tax deduction and other related tax strategies, explain the process, and share information about ideal candidates and eligible projects so you know how to get started.

http://tnenergy.org/event/getting-your-moneys-worth-out-of-energy-efficiency/

TVA forms advisory energy panels

The Tennessee Valley Authority is forming two new advisory boards this fall to give advice and counsel about the changing power market ahead.

TVA is creating a new 19-member panel known as the Regional Energy Resource Council to offer ongoing input into how TVA balances the need for reliable power and low-cost electricity with energy efficiency, cleaner energy and transmission requirements. Joe Hoagland, chief technology officer for TVA, said the new council “will provide valuable advice as TVA develops policies and strategies associated with our future.” “TVA wants to ensue that it manages the power system with all public interests in mind,” Hoagland said.

The new Regional Energy Resource Council is headed by Goodrich “Gus” Rogers, the president of the Jackson County Economic Development Authority in Alabama. Rogers is an ardent supporter of finishing the incomplete Bellefonte Nuclear Power Plant his Hollywood, Ala., which TVA will consider in is long-range power plan. But other members of the 19-member panel approved by the TVA board have differing views.

TVA spokesman Scott Brooks said TVA also will soon form an advisory board to help guide its Integrated Resource Plan, which is a 10-year plan for future power growth in the Valley.

original article

Photovoltaic System Pricing Updated 2013

The following is an extract from a recent study by Lawrence Berkeley National Labs and National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The report is a high-level overview of historical, recent, and projected near-term PV system pricing trends in the United States, drawing on several ongoing research activities at LBNL and NREL. Prices are subject to the location, suppliers, pricing, as well as local economic factors. According to the report near future analysts expect system prices to continue to fall, but for module prices to stabilize (Module ASP projected to be between $0.50/W – $0.75/W by 2014 ).

Modeled overnight capital cost for systems quoted in Q4 2012 (expected to be installed in 2013):

Residential (5.1 kW) was $3.69/W, a reduction of 13% from Q4 2011

Commercial (222.5 kW) was $2.61/W, a reduction of 19% from Q4 2011

Utility-scale (192.8 MW) was $1.92/W, a reduction of 23% from Q4 2011.

The report can be downloaded here

DOW Solar Powerhouse Shingle

On November 2nd, TSEA will hold the 4th annual Solar Tour. One of the stops on the tour will be with Twin Willows Development off of Hardin Valley Rd, near Buttermilk Dr. The first house, installed with DOW’s solar shingles, will be explained by subdivision developer Adam Hutsell, and his installer, Jim Laborde. This will be a first for TVA, in which a developer will be installing solar as part of the overall construction of the homes at no extra cost. In addition to the solar, the energy saving features of the construction and choice of appliances tend to save energy, reducing the cost of monthly expenses. The tour will begin with an introductory talk at 8:30, at the Public Meeting room at Knoxville Transit Center on Church St(across the street to the Civic Center). We have limited seating, so arrive as soon as possible to ensure a place on our bus!

TVA launches community solar initiative

The Tennessee Valley Authority has recently developed a community solar initiative designed to add at least 500 kilowatts of solar energy for their utility and government properties.

TVA issued a request for proposals (RFP) on Aug. 15 to identify community members interested in participating in this Solar Aggregated Value and Education (SAVE) initiative.

This initiative will also provide an opportunity to test the market for the upfront purchase of Renewable Energy Credits, or RECS, that are directly tied to generation from a local solar facility.  RECs represent the property rights to the environmental, social and non-power qualities of renewable electricity generation. RECs are sometimes purchased to meet legislative or regulatory mandates, meet internal goals, support environmental stewardship and other objectives.

The RFP will be handled through a two-stage application process.  The submission deadline for the concept paper proposal will be in November 2013, with the full application due in February 2014 for those selected past the first stage. Final selection of participants is planned for April 2014.

The  SAVE initiative is the first of 11 projects TVA is launching as part of  a Clean Air Agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that support TVA’s vision for low-cost and cleaner energy.

The innovative approach tries to provide renewable credits and tax breaks for industry, the chance for residents to promote more solar power and the opportunity for TVA to get more renewable power to comply with a 2-year-old settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

TVA began soliciting proposals under the new Solar Aggregated Value and Education (SAVE) program last month. Program director Neil Placer said TVA expects to have one or two solar projects added to its grid by 2015.

Original article here

Solution to Homeowner’s Association Problem with Aesthetics of Roof Mounted Solar PV

TSEA has had a number of anguished calls from homeowners who want to add solar PV to their roofs but the homeowner’s association do not like the looks of panel mounted solar panels. It is an aesthetic problem and so far the covenant has stopped the interested parties from adding solar. There is an answer to homeowners who are adamant about having solar energy for their home. The answer is solar shingles like those offered by Dow Powerhouse Solar Shingles. The following are two examples where looks were important: first, a historic building and the second, a home owners association.

In Katy, TX we had a project opportunity in a neighborhood with regulations against rooftop solar panels. Dow Solar and the homeowner presented the technology and the installed aesthetics to the homeowner’s association board, and won their approval for the project. The system has been installed, and the homeowner and neighbors have been pleased with the outcome. This link is a short video re-cap of the project.

Dow’s Powerhouse Solar Shingle

In Sag Harbor, NY solar shingles from Dow had a opportunity on a church located in a historic district that was being renovated into a commercial design studio. The building owner had tried unsuccessfully on multiple occasions to win approval to install conventional solar panels on the church as part of the renovation. Dow and the building owner presented POWERHOUSE to the architectural review board in Sag Harbor, and again won their approval for the project.

Other suppliers of solar shingles include Apollo II by Certainteed shown here

Net Metering Around the Country: Need I Say More?

Looks the few is us!

IRA Charitable Rollover Extended

As a provision of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, IRA Charitable Rollover was extended through December 2013. This allows individuals who are 70 ½ and older to make a direct transfer totaling up to $100,000 per year to 501(c)3 organizations, like the TSEA, without having to count the transfers as income for federal income tax purposes. With funding, this organization could reach out to the citizens of Tennessee in promoting clean energy for our lives and the lives of our children and their children. Help us make Tennessee cleaner than ever by supporting the American Solar Energy Society as well as Tennessee Solar Energy Association.

Solar Panels Growing Hazard for Firefighters – Why the Need for Integrated Converter with each panel

Firefighters battling the massive 11-alarm blaze at the Dietz & Watson distribution center in South Jersey faced an unlikely foe during the fight — solar panels.
A solar array with more than 7,000 photovoltaic panels lined the roof of the nearly 300,000 square-foot refrigeration facility which served as a temporary storage center for the company’s deli meats and cheeses. But the panels, while environmentally sustainable and cost-saving, may have led to the complete destruction of the warehouse.
Fighting the fire under bright blue skies Sunday, Delanco Fire Chief Ron Holt was forced to keep firefighters from attacking the blaze from the roof because of electrocution concerns.
“With all that power and energy up there, I can’t jeopardize a guy’s life for that,” said Holt. Those electrocution fears combined with concerns of a collapse forced firefighters to simply spray the building with water and foam from afar.
Ken Willette from the National Fire Protection Association, a nonprofit that develops standards for firefighting, says electrocution is one of the hazards firefighters are increasingly facing fighting blazes at structures where solar panels are deployed.
“Those panels, as long as there’s any kind of light present, whether it’s daylight or it’s electronic lamp light, will generate electricity,” he said.
A 2011 study from the Underwriters Laboratory found solar panels, being individual energy producers, could not be easily de-energized from a single point like other electric sources. Researchers recommended throwing a tarp over the panels to block light, but only if crews could safely get to the area.

original article

SLevy: The issue is the series connection of many panels result in high voltages being developed which could be lethal if improperly handled. There are several answers but the one that makes the most sense to me is to modify the junction box in the back of each panel with an intelligent converter (either a DC-DC converter or a DC-AC inverter) that can disconnect itself from the string either from an internal sensor detecting a fault condition, like heat, or by the main disconnect for the solar system being activated so that all panels are isolated from each other. Then the danger is controlled and fire-persons can do their job and not worry about high voltage danger. A wireless remote monitor will verify the safe condition allowing firefighters to do their job in safety. The other benefit to the solar array owner is the same detection system will warn of panels being stolen. The cost of the intelligent converter should be 10% or less than the cost of the basic panel. Present fire safety regulations do not address this problem.

Cap on TVA purchases brings solar eclipse to industry

Since the year 2000, the number of solar power installations in the Tennessee Valley has grown from only three to nearly 1,700.
Buoyed by some of the most generous incentives offered by any utility in the South, TVA gets as much power from the sun as it does from either Norris or Chickamauga dams.
But the boom in small-scale solar generation has turned to a bust for many solar installers this summer. TVA capped its 17-cents-per-kilowatt-hour payment for solar generation to only 10 megawatts this year and the limit quickly was reached before many interested homeowners and businesses were able to take advantage of the offer.
Solar power enthusiasts appealed to TVA directors Thursday to buy more solar through its Green Power Providers program. TVA spends about $25 million a year in above-market payments to buy solar generation to help meet its goal of getting more electricity from renewable sources.
As solar panels become more efficient and the industry matures, TVA is looking to cut that subsidy and move toward more market-rate prices for solar generation.
TVA and Pickwick Electric Cooperative are working with Strata Solar to develop two 20-megawatt solar farms near Selmer, Tenn., which will sell power to TVA at market rates. The new solar installations will be the biggest yet in Tennessee and could provide enough electricity for 4,000 Valley homes.
“I actually think we’ve been in a pretty good spot here,” TVA President Bill Johnson said. “As the price comes down, we can afford to do more solar.”
TVA Chairman Bill Sansom said TVA has to balance the costs of subsidizing small solar units, which tend to increase the average price of TVA power, with consumer desires for more solar and assistance to help nurture the new industry.
TVA opened up another 2.5 megawatts in its Green Power Partners program on Aug. 1, but that capacity was sold at auction in only one minute and most applicants didn’t get a piece of the program. TVA has not yet set the price or capacity for its solar programs for 2014, but officials said the utility should soon announce its plans.
“We are looking at the program and we’re looking at the type of adjustments that we can make to help make it a little more friendly for folks,” said Joe Hoagland, TVA’s senior vice president of policy and oversight.
Large-scale solar farms are adding solar generation at less cost for TVA, Hoagland said. TVA still has nearly 75 percent of the capacity available for such large-scale, market-rate solar generation.
“We want to see more of those because they not only give us more renewable energy, they do it without putting any extra burden on our other ratepayers,” Hoagland said.
Future purchase plans and incentives for renewable power will be shaped, in part, by a new Integrated Resource Plan TVA will launch this fall to study future power options for the next two decades. The updated power plan will be finalized by 2015, Hoagland said.

original article