Archive for Solar Performanc

Secretary of Energy, Dr. Ernest Moniz, here at U.T. Friday, April 25th to Deliver Baker Distinguished Lecture on Energy

moniz-240x300Secretary Moniz coming to Tennessee U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz will deliver the Baker Distinguished Lecture on Energy and the Environment on Friday, April 25 from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the UT College of Law, Room 132, located at 1505 W. Cumberland Ave.

As energy secretary, Moniz leads the U.S. Department of Energy in support of President Barack Obama’s goals of growing the economy, enhancing security, and protecting the environment.

The event is free and open to the public. Paid public parking will be available in the Volunteer Hall Garage.

The lecture will also be streamed live online. More details are available here.

Electrochemical Energy Storage ASM Educational Symposium

Energy Storage is the key to large scale solar plants as well as the smart grid. Here is an opportunity to find out where we are in energy storage and what will the future bring. More importantly, when low cost energy storage will hit the Walmarts of this world.

WHAT: This educational symposium will bring together speakers from industry, academia, and national laboratories to review the state of the art of lithium ion batteries and the future of electrochemical energy storage within the materials and device level and advances in characterization techniques for these devices and materials. There will also be a tour of the DOE Battery Manufacturing R&D Facility at ORNL. Electrochemical energy storage has become more and more important. In the past, electrochemical energy storage has been limited in size and energy density. Associated with its high cost for higher energy density, consumer electronics was the sole market for electrochemical energy storage until recently. Now, electrochemical energy storage transforms power tool, automotive, and electricity grid markets. Power tools benefit from the tremendous power capabilities of newly developed lithium ion batteries, automotive and grid scale storage which has become more available with new manufacturing technologies for large format devices. This educational symposium will bring together speakers from industry, academia, and national laboratories to review the state of the art of lithium ion batteries and the future of electrochemical energy storage within the materials and device level and advances in characterization techniques for these devices and materials.

WHEN: Wednesday, April 16, 2014
TIME:
WHERE: National Transportation Research Center (NTRC) and Manufacturing Demonstration Facility
2360/2370 Cherahala Blvd.
Knoxville, TN 37932
COST: General – $100
Student – $30
Retirees – $50
REGISTER: Registration deadline is March 27
RSVP/
QUESTIONS: Claus Daniel
danielc@ornl.gov
Melanie Kirkham
kirkhammj@ornl.gov

Apply now for 2014 Rural Energy for America Funding

solar farming2Farmers, ranchers and rural small businesses can apply now for grants and loan guarantees for clean energy projects under the Rural Energy for America Program – or REAP. REAP was renewed in the 2014 Farm Bill and supports a wide range of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, including wind, solar, biogas, biomass, small hydroelectric, geothermal, tidal, wave, and hydroelectric technologies.

An official notice of funding availability is expected in early April, with an application deadline 60 days later. This notice would be for funds from the 2014 appropriation plus funds carried over from previous years (total about $28 million). When the final REAP rule is announced, possibly in June or July, a second funding announcement will be issued for the 2014 mandatory funding ($50 million) from the new Farm Bill. Applications submitted but not funded in the first round will be considered in the second round.

Applicants should also be sure to check in early with the state staff of USDA rural development. They can answer questions, provide useful advice and may need to visit the project during the application process.

For more information go to: http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/TN-Home.html

Free Workshop On Benefits And Incentives Available For Solar To Area Residents

Do-It-Yourself Workshop. Ours will be comfortably indoors

Do-It-Yourself Workshop. Ours will be comfortably indoors

green|spaces in partnership with Aries Energy, is providing a free workshop to local residents that are interested in solar for their homes. The workshop will take place on March 19 at green|spaces, 63 E. Main Street Chattanooga, Tn. 37408 from 8-9 a.m.

Attendees will learn about the Tennessee Solar Program including incentives, credits, federal tax credits and applications. Additionally, the workshop will cover information on the typical grid-tied system and other unique solar installations. TVA has an annual cap on the solar programs it offers. The residential program is filling rapidly.

To r.s.v.p., individuals may contact Dawn Hjelseth at 423 648-0963 or email dawn@greenspaceschattanooga.com.

A One Megawatt Project Planned for Oak Ridge

Restoration SevicesRestoration Services Inc. is partnering with Vis Solis to build a one megawatt solar farm at the East Tennessee Technology Park, former K-25 site, on a site leased from Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). The solar power generated electricity will go to the TVA grid to run the equivalent of nearly 150 homes. Gil Hough, manager of the renewable energy division of Restoration Services says that is almost a done deal. Construction is expected to start in April. What makes this solar installation unique is the use of Vis Solis tracking of the sun to always keep the panels pointed towards the sun for maximum performance. The increase in power production can be as high as 30% over the conventional fixed arrays.

Installers and Solar Distributors Having Products for Farming Applications Should Attend No-Till Day

Milan No till field day
Visitors from around the world come to Milan on the fourth Thursday in July to learn the latest about no-tillage crop production techniques. In 2012, attendance at this event included 2,748 visitors from 65 Tennessee counties, 21 states (AL, AR, DE, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MI, MN, MS, MO, NE, NC, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA), and three international countries (Brazil, Lesotho and Mozambique). If you are interested in participating in their exhibition area, please contact me (Steve at 865-074-9218). If I do not answer, leave a message with your name, company, phone number and email address. I will respond via email with more information. They have an extensive industry/educational trade show and I will give you details.

What’s the Story of Snow Covered Panels

Assume you live in the upper reaches of Minnesota and you are told that solar panels won’t work in cold, snowy climates. Wrong!! Yes, admittedly you have to do some clearing of snow off your panels but there are some preventive measures you can take to keep the solar power production at its peak. First, realize that though the sun’s rays are not as strong in the winter as during the summer; the sun does not rise as high. But the colder temperatures increase the efficiency of the panels that help boost the output power of the system. With that in mind, here are some tips for improving the power delivery of your system:
1. Bounce a tennis ball off snow-covered panels.
Homeowners who have rooftop solar panels installed can surprisingly increase the energy output by bouncing a tennis ball off the snow-covered panels. The small divots created by the tennis ball help begin the snow shed process and allow sunlight to reach the modules and begin converting energy.

2. Install solar panels at the largest angle possible.
A higher angle lessens the accumulation of snow on top of the panel. Everyone that is in a very snowy place, like in northern Michigan, should be aggressive in your tilting angle. So if you have a decision to make between something like 30 degrees or 40 degrees, it’s better to go 40 degrees.

3. Don’t set up panels in a way that allows snow to gather at the bottom.
Installing panels in a way that allows the snow to fall freely from the array greatly reduces the impact of snow. When snow slides off the panel at an angle and gathers at the bottom of the module, the losses can significant. In those cases, when you have a very low tilt angle and a dam [of snow], you can lose all of the solar energy associated with the winter.

LightWave Solar offers a Portable Solar Power Bank

portable solar powerbankOff-grid, Portable Solar PowerBanks

LightWave Solar offers a Portable Solar Power Bank that uses the sun’s power where and when it’s needed most: power outages, farm maintenance, camping, tailgating, trade shows, etc.

The solar power bank charges quickly and can provide enough electricity for hours of lighting, refrigeration, fans, cell phone/laptop charging, entertainment systems, small power tools and more.

The solar power bank retails for $3,960 and is eligible for a 30% tax credit, bringing the cost of the unit down to $2,772. In addition, existing LightWave Solar customers receive a 10% discount!

TVA seeks public input on energy needs

The Tennessee Valley Authority is gathering public input on a long-range plan for the type and mix of energy sources it needs to provide power to the region.

Finding the right mix of coal, nuclear, natural gas, hydro-electric, renewable energy and efficiency programs is the goal of the 18-month-long planning process, TVA Vice President Joe Hoagland said. “It takes a very long, strategic look at the assets TVA needs to provide low-cost electricity for the people in the Tennessee Valley,” Hoagland said in an interview.

The direction TVA takes will ultimately affect how much residents pay for electricity, and the federal utility is embarking on the planning process at a time when it faces scrutiny from a variety of interest groups.

TVA is spending more than $1 billion to install new pollution controls at its coal-fired power plant in Gallatin. Environmental groups sued TVA for not fully studying alternatives, including retiring the aging facility.

Conservation groups and the solar industry in Tennessee have criticized TVA for not doing enough to support that renewable resource. They say TVA’s small-scale solar program is stifling the industry because it sets a cap on solar power far below demand. Some of the solar installation companies have to look outside the state for work. Our polysilicon manufacturers have laid off their work force. The on-again, off-again opportunities for solar installations are killing the solar businesses in Tennessee.

I attended the first meeting along with 15 other people. Promises of answers to questions have not been received by those that asked questions which the moderator could not answer.

Hoagland said gathering input helps TVA understand what the public and other stakeholders consider important. The “Integrated Resource Plan” looks at different fuel options and tries to anticipate how those might evolve over the next two decades, he said.

TVA completed its last plan in 2011 and typically only does an update every three to five years. But Hoagland said changes in the energy industry require an earlier update.

Natural gas prices have dropped dramatically in recent years in the midst of a nationwide surge in production. At the same time, TVA’s growth in power demand has slowed, Hoagland said.

The 2011 plan anticipated natural gas prices at about $6 per million BTUs, escalating over time, Hoagland said. Now, prices are between $3 and $3.50, he said. The current plan also assumed a 2 percent to 3 percent rate of growth, while TVA now anticipates growth at less than 1 percent.

In addition, TVA hopes to complete the Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 2 plant in 2015 and retire at least 2,700 megawatts of less-efficient coal capacity by 2018.

Anne Davis, managing attorney in Nashville for the Southern Environmental Law Center, said Tuesday that she appreciates that TVA is accelerating the start of the new resource plan. She said she expects the new plan to focus on how TVA will replace its “oldest, dirtiest, and least efficient coal plants with clean and modern resources like solar, wind, hydro optimization, energy efficiency, and demand response.”

“The precipitous drop in cost of renewables and technological improvements in efficiency — coupled with enormous public demand for both of these resources — will demand more attention in this IRP,” Davis said by email.

“We have already been working with TVA on these issues, and we are committed to helping TVA modernize its long-term portfolio in a way that’s protective of ratepayers’ health, environment, and pocketbooks.”

The first public meeting was held on Thursday, October 24th in Knoxville. A second is scheduled for Nov. 6 in Memphis. To encourage more input, TVA is allowing the public to participate through online webinars. The public can access those at www.tva.gov/irp.

TVA hopes to use the webinars and a social media outreach effort to boost public participation, particular with younger residents, Hoagland said.

most of this article was taken from the Tennessean article: http://www.tennessean.com/article/20131023/NEWS/310230137/

4 Factors Driving the Marriage of Solar and Energy Storage

A solar-powered microgrid demonstrates the potential of coupling big batteries with commercial solar. What if you could finance the energy storage equipment, much the way solar panels are financed, and the batteries provided a revenue stream? Modern grid-scale battery systems are only put in place to save money or provide services to the grid. An example is one installation that includes 402 kilowatts’ worth of solar canopies in the parking lot and, in a twist that differentiates it from most commercial solar projects, a shipping-container-sized battery from startup Solar Grid Storage. Here in Knoxville we have a battery enhanced solar powered car-charging station located at the EPRI location off Dutchtown Road. On a daily basis, though, the battery will deliver frequency regulation services to the local wholesale grid. By providing quick bursts of power to keep a steady balance between supply and demand, battery owner Solar Grid Storage will earn money that is normally paid to natural gas power plant operators.

Here are the factors that are driving the combination of commercial solar and energy storage.

1. The technology is there. Better batteries are in development that will lower cost.

2. The economics can make sense. AES Energy Storage, for instance, provides frequency regulation services at a wind farm in West Virginia, buffered by a 32-megawatt lithium-ion battery bank. Revenue comes from reducing demand charges by using stored energy during peak hours. Most of its customers are in California, which has subsidies for distributed energy storage. By contrast, the desire to have emergency power has become a priority in East Coast states hit hard by Hurricane Sandy and other severe storms.

3. Solar installers want storage — if it pencils out. Military bases and island locations that rely on diesel generators are obvious candidates. A battery can smooth out the flow of power that panels provide to the local grid and address issues, such as the drops in voltage that come when clouds pass over. Batteries could also enable solar installations in places, such as farms, which would have required costly upgrades to the grid infrastructure. The contracts to finance a combined solar and storage system are complex and need to become more standardized, as power purchase agreements are, said president Scott Wiater of Standard Solar. Financing these types of systems is still relatively new and developers need to find customers willing to try not only solar, but also relatively new energy storage technology.

4. NRG Energy Inc. and Exelon Corp.’s Constellation unit say interest in combining solar power with battery storage has soared in the year since Hurricane Sandy knocked out power to millions of homes and businesses on the East Coast. They are among more than a dozen solar providers that have introduced or enhanced in the past year systems that combine rooftop solar panels that generate power and batteries that retain electricity to use later.
People with solar-powered homes and businesses were frustrated to discover that losing power from local utilities also knocked out the inverters that connect rooftop panels to the grid, leaving them unable to tap the electricity they were producing. Adding battery storage solves that problem, said Tom Doyle, chief executive officer of NRG’s solar unit.

It’s also a growing threat to utilities.
“When Sandy came along we really didn’t have a product to keep solar power flowing during blackouts,” Doyle said in an interview yesterday at the Solar Power International conference in Chicago. “Now we can install systems that continue operating when the grid fails, and the costs are coming down.”
Battery storage can add more than 20 percent to the cost of a typical 10-kilowatt solar system for a four-bedroom home, Brendon Quinlivan, director of solar development at Constellation, said in an interview.

original article can be found at: http://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/three-factors-driving-the-marriage-of-solar-and-energy-storage and http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-10-23/nrg-and-exelon-see-batteries-spurring-demand-for-solar.html