Archive for PV Tech Newscast

Strata Solar will build and maintain two 20-megawatt solar farms interconnected to the TVA power system

Strata Solar is working with the Tennessee Valley Authority and Pickwick Electric Cooperative to develop the two largest solar energy installations in the Tennessee Valley near Selmer in McNairy County, TN. TVA will buy the electricity at market rates under TVA’s Renewable Standard Offer program.

“This project will add a tremendous amount of solar power to our already strong renewable lineup,” said Patty West, TVA director of Renewable Energy Programs. “Because TVA is purchasing the output at market rates, the electricity will also be among our cheapest solar power, moving us toward our vision of being a national leader in providing low-cost and cleaner energy.”
Current plans call for the solar farms to have more than 160,000 solar panels installed on over 300 acres. Each farm will be four times bigger than the largest current solar installation on the TVA system, the University of Tennessee’s five-megawatt West Tennessee Solar Farm that opened in 2012 in Haywood County, TN.

The Strata Solar projects have been accepted into TVA’s Renewable Standard Offer program, pending an environmental review and interconnection studies that must be completed before construction begins. TVA is accepting public comments on the environmental review online at http://www.tva.com/environment/reports/strata/index.htm through Aug. 13.

Referenced article

On Rooftops, a Rival for Utilities


For years, power companies have watched warily as solar panels have sprouted across the nation’s rooftops. Now, in almost panicked tones, they are fighting hard to slow the spread. And yet, to hear executives tell it, such power sources could ultimately threaten traditional utilities’ ability to maintain the nation’s grid. The battle is playing out among energy executives, lawmakers and regulators across the country. At the heart of the fight is a credit system called net metering, which pays residential and commercial customers for excess renewable energy they sell back to utilities. Currently, 43 states, the District of Columbia and 4 territories offer a form of the incentive, according to the Energy Department.

Many utilities cling to their established business, and its centralized distribution of energy, until they can figure out a new way to make money. It is a question the Obama administration is grappling with as well as it promotes the integration of more renewable energy into the grid. “I see an opportunity for us to recreate ourselves, just like the telecommunications industry did,” Michael W. Yackira, chief executive of NV Energy, a Nevada utility, and chairman of the industry group the Edison Electric Institute, said at the group’s convention. But utility executives say that when solar customers no longer pay for electricity, they also stop paying for the grid, shifting those costs to other customers.

Utilities generally make their profits by making investments in infrastructure and designing customer rates to earn that money back with a guaranteed return, set on average at about 10 percent. A handful of utilities have taken a different approach and are instead getting into the business of developing rooftop systems themselves. Dominion, for example, is running a pilot program in Virginia in which it leases roof space from commercial customers and installs its own panels to study the benefits of a decentralized generation.

Featured in the July/August issue of Solar Today Magazine is our remedy for this issue. Solar energy through micro-investing could be a solution for both the utility company and the customer. The individual or business would invest in solar energy with a small monthly purchase, perhaps $5 per month, using the micro-investment plan. This would provide opportunities to for all rate payers to invest in solar projects that would directly benefit them through lower electricity rates and return on investment. It overcomes the financing and siting obstacles that can keep would-be investors on the sidelines. As an example, if all TVA ratepayers became micro-investors at a rate of $5 per month, each year TVA would generate $135 million for constructing solar farms. This model protects everyone’s interest.

FREE WEBINAR: Best Practices for Effective Energy Efficiency Program Design: From Strategy to Savings

DATE: Wednesday, May 15, 2013
TIME: 1:00 PM ET/10:00 AM PT  

Please join Nexant, Greentech Media, PacifiCorp, and Santee Cooper as we discuss best practices for effective energy efficiency program design, including utility program case studies.  The changing landscape of demand side management (DSM) energy efficiency programs requires utilities to leverage a combination of industry best practices and innovation in technologies to successfully plan, design and deploy DSM programs.  Join us for this one hour webinar to learn about: 
· Effective DSM program design and why it is important
· Defining a program’s success while identifying barriers and challenges in the marketplace
· Meeting compliance requirements and energy savings goals
· Managing increasingly complex programs in a cost-effective manner
· Improving customer and trade ally engagement, satisfaction and participation

Registration Fee: Free

Free Small Business Innovative Research Funding Workshop May 22, 2013

“Introduction to SBIR/STTR Funding” Workshop

Please see information below on SBIR workshops across Tennessee – May 20, 22, 23 2013. Registration links are provided. The workshops will be in Jackson, Knoxville and Johnson City.

Jackson Chamber May 20th from 8:30 am until 3:00 pm
197 Auditorium St
Jackson, TN 38301

Knoxville Entrepreneur Center May 22nd from 8:30 am til 3:30 pm
17 Market Square, Suite 101
Knoxville, TN 37902

ETSU Innovation Lab, Training Center May 23, 2013 from 8:30 am til 3:30 pm
2109 West Market Street
Johnson City, TN 37604

This workshop provides a thorough introduction to the SBIR/STTR programs and will highlight funding opportunities.

Mark Henry, founder of Grow Emerging Companies, LLC, will present this free workshop for local researchers & business partners interested in learning about SBIR/STTR funding opportunities. Registration is free & Lunch will be provided.

Seats Are Limited – Click Here To Register Today!

For more information, contact:
Michael Carroll, michael.carroll@knoxec.net | Katie Connell, katie.connell@knoxec.net
Jim Stefansic, jim@launchtn.org

For questions regarding registration, please contact Patty Wells at patricia.wells@tennessee.edu or (615) 253-6371

story about solar starting to break into the mainstream

Home Depot expands its solar service offerings to the East Coast by partnering with two other fast-growing providers, Sunrun and Clean Power Finance.
The experience of Roof Diagnostics Solar — a leading contractor partnering with Sunrun, Clean Power Finance, and Home Depot on the East Coast — offers a window into how these arrangements are boosting solar sales.
A year and a half ago, Roof Diagnostics participated in a Home Depot pilot program with one other company in fourteen New Jersey stores. It set out a kiosk with a laptop, 40-inch television, and a solar specialist who could do a simple assessment of a home from the store.
The immediate reaction was “explosive,” said Pegler Jr., with 68 sales coming in the first 60 days. A couple weeks later, they were given twenty-one stores. And the company will be offering solar in 100 locations by the end of the year in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts — with most of those kiosks located in the first aisle of the stores.

Four out of every ten people who visit the Home Depot kiosk sign up for a solar lease or power purchase agreement with Roof Diagnostics. Pegler Jr. believes it’s a sign that the Northeastern solar market is maturing. Because states like New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts have strong solar programs, consumers generally know about the opportunity. But seeing a kiosk in a Home Depot store can be the difference between someone thinking about solar and actually taking action.

original article

42nd National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2013, in Baltimore, April 16-20

Register today at the American Solar Energy Society for the conference details and sign up.

Highlights of the technical session include:
New techniques for making high-performance quantum-dot and nanoparticle photovoltaic cells.

The status of the High Definition PV project, an industry-wide program to reduce the cost of solar installations through plug-and-play standardization.

Several new techniques to reduce the cost of dispatchable power from concentrating solar thermal (CSP) plants, a key development in providing cheap, clean solar power to run municipal grids through the night.

Solar-powered furnaces that generate hydrogen or syngas fuels at high efficiency.

A wide variety of simplified techniques for minute-to-minute and hour-to-hour forecasting of solar farm output, useful for balancing loads across geographic regions.

Efficient new ways to store solar-heated hot water – and use solar heat to drive air conditioners.

Cheap feedstocks for cheap biodiesel.

Hybrid light rail that runs when the grid goes down.

Driving large desalination and waste-water recovery systems with renewable energy.

Promoting Solar PV Deployment Through Micro-Investments

This conference is hosted by the American Solar Energy Society to which TSEA is the Tennessee State Chapter. Established in 1954, the nonprofit American Solar Energy Society is the nation’s leading association of solar professionals and advocates. Our mission is to speed the transition to a sustainable energy economy.

New Thin-Film Solar Cell May Provide Electricity at Grid Parity Using Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

Global Photonic Energy Corp. (GPEC), has created a thin-film solar cell that has the ability to provide electricity at grid parity or the cost of traditionally provided electricity.
Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) is a better photovoltaic candidate than silicon reaching 30% or better efficiency. Problem with Gallium Arsenide cells is that they are very expensive to manufacture in large sizes. Instead these cells are used in concentrating solar PV arrays where the sun image is concentrated some 500 times focusing the light onto a small millimeter sized GaAs cell.

Dr. Stephen R. Forrest of the University of Michigan said the breakthrough, presented at the Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society, is the result of substantially reduced production costs. It is based on a patent-pending invention that reuses the same Gallium Arsenide wafer multiple times to produce solar cells. This unlimited wafer reuse approach to conventional “epitaxial lift off” technology that typically leads to wafer damage, and hence only a very limited number (1 to 2) of wafer reuses, has the potential to reduce the cost of a typical Gallium Arsenide solar cell to below $1 per Watt (peak).

“This exciting development implies that ultra-high efficiency solar cells based on Gallium Arsenide can eventually produce electricity at or below grid parity.” Dr. Forrest stated. “Using integrated solar concentrators and our adhesive-free, cold-weld bonding technology to plastic substrates, we estimate electricity could be produced as low as $0.45 cents per Watt, compared to traditional grid parity of $1 per Watt.”

GPEC is excited by the discovery. With this new discovery, the cost structure is dramatically reduced and can be used in numerous applications. The high efficiency, light weight and flexible solar cells are deployed on roll up plastic sheets. GPEC anticipates their use in spot powering vehicles, mobile military equipment and satellites, and off-grid locations. The company has big plans and want to license its intellectual property in order to commercialize the technology. To date, GPEC has a total of 425 patents.

Latest NREL Report Suggests that Tennessee Has a Solar PV Potential of 20 Times the Amount of Electricity Used in the State

In a government report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory demonstrates the tremendous potential for solar energy generation in Tennessee. The report estimates the technical potential of solar PV as well as other renewable power sources for the production of electrical power. It is a study of the potential based on renewable resource availability and quality, technical system performance, topographic limitations, environmental, and land-use constraints only. The study does not consider the economic, political or market constraints. In 2010, Tennessee used 103,522 GWh (103,522,000,000 kWh). The report estimates that the total solar potential including rural and urban utility-scale PV as well as roof-top solar would amount to 2,295,918 GWh.

The full report can be found here

PV Tech Newscast – July 6, 2012

PV Tech Newscast – June 8, 2012