Archive for Benjamin Maddox

Igloo-shaped building attracts attention

WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather

Made possible through a grant from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), the building is solar-powered and made of a material called Colfibrex. It’s water resistant, mold resistant, and very energy-efficient. It’s design makes for a great tornado shelter, too.

The building is open to the public and for all ages. Inside you’ll find materials and video kiosks with information about conservation, sustainable living, recycling “Dos and Don’ts”, and more. Stop in on your next recycling trip, or to arrange a tour ahead of time contact the Athens Public Works Department.

Franklin will add second solar panel array

Franklin will lease unused land to a Nashville-based company for the future installation of a new solar panel array.

Energy Source Partners is proposing to spend $2.6 million to build a new solar array on a 3-acre sludge field site near Mack Hatcher Parkway. That array is expected to generate 1 megawatt of electricity, which would be sold to the Tennessee Valley Authority.

Over the course of the proposed 20-year contract, the 1 megawatt panels would generate $165,000 for Franklin by the 10th year of the program and about $800,000 from years 10 to 20.

Last year, Franklin leased part of an empty sludge field near its sewer plant off Claude Yates Drive to Nashville-based Energy Source Partners, which paid about $1 million to install 940 solar panels on the land. Those panels, which generate about 200 kilowatts, capture sun rays and convert them to electricity, which is then resold.

To Those Influencing Environmental Policy But Opposed to Nuclear Power

Four climate scientists, three of whom have published in peer-reviewed literature on energy issues (a sampler from Wigley, Hansen and Caldeira), are pressing the case for environmental groups to embrace the need for a new generation of nuclear power plants in a letter they distributed overnight to a variety of organizations and journalists.Here’s the text of the letter, by Kenneth Caldeira of the Carnegie Institution, Kerry Emanuel at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, James E. Hansen of Columbia University and Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research and the University of Adelaide*:

“To those influencing environmental policy but opposed to nuclear power:

As climate and energy scientists concerned with global climate change, we are writing to urge you to advocate the development and deployment of safer nuclear energy systems. We appreciate your organization’s concern about global warming, and your advocacy of renewable energy. But continued opposition to nuclear power threatens humanity’s ability to avoid dangerous climate change.

At the same time, the need to sharply reduce greenhouse gas emissions is becoming ever clearer. We can only increase energy supply while simultaneously reducing greenhouse gas emissions if new power plants turn away from using the atmosphere as a waste dump.Renewables like wind and solar and biomass will certainly play roles in a future energy economy, but those energy sources cannot scale up fast enough to deliver cheap and reliable power at the scale the global economy requires. While it may be theoretically possible to stabilize the climate without nuclear power, in the real world there is no credible path to climate stabilization that does not include a substantial role for nuclear power.

Quantitative analyses show that the risks associated with the expanded use of nuclear energy are orders of magnitude smaller than the risks associated with fossil fuels. No energy system is without downsides. We ask only that energy system decisions be based on facts, and not on emotions and biases that do not apply to 21st century nuclear technology.

We ask you and your organization to demonstrate its real concern about risks from climate damage by calling for the development and deployment of advanced nuclear energy.
Sincerely,
Dr. Ken Caldeira, Senior Scientist, Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution
Dr. Kerry Emanuel, Atmospheric Scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Dr. James Hansen, Climate Scientist, Columbia University Earth Institute
Dr. Tom Wigley, Climate Scientist, University of East Anglia and the National Center for Atmospheric Research”

Source for article.

KKR and Google to Invest in Six U.S. Solar Power Plants

KKR & Co. and Google Inc. have struck a pact to invest about $400 million in six solar-power plants being built by Recurrent Energy LLC in California and Arizona. Development of the plants has been under way for years and they are expected to go online and begin producing power in January, the people said.

The plants—five in southern California and one in Arizona—are designed to produce about 106 megawatts of electricity combined, or enough to power about 17,000 U.S. homes, they said. San Francisco-based Recurrent, which will continue as their operator, has struck long-term power supply agreements with three buyers for the electricity they’re expected to churn, the people said.

USDA Now Accepting Applications for Solar Grants

Eric Wooldridge of Bells Bend Neighborhood Farms was approved for a grant this year.
USDA’s Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) grant for agricultural producers and small rural businesses covers up to 25% of the cost of a solar installation. The local office is now accepting applications!

“We anticipate funding levels under REAP for 2014 to be at or higher than last year, so applications have a stronger chance of receiving awards than previous years,” says Will Dodson, Energy Director at USDA, Rural Development in Tennessee.

The application deadline has not been announced, but it is likely to be early next year.

A farm grant lunch and learn will be held next month in Hopkinsville, KY! Click here for info.

Also, here is a link to the REAP program. We have chosen the Oregon site, because it has all the information, instructions, and forms to apply. Tennessee’s REAP site can be found here.

Chattanooga earns top environmental sustainability rating from TVA

Tuesday, Chattanooga won a top environmental sustainability rating that officials believe will help it attract more jobs and businesses. Millie Callaway, a TVA senior consultant for economic development, said only 13 communities in its seven-state service area will be cited this year. Just two others are platinum, or top-ranked, so far — Knoxville and Oak Ridge. TVA sponsored the initiative to help cities and counties catalogue their sustainable assets, and the effort is weighted toward business actions, Callaway said.
Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke said the citation highlights the link between sustainability, economic development and quality of life. “I think a lot about the Chattanooga brand,” he said at a news conference. “It’s so tied up with sustainability.”
Officials on Tuesday noted Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant, which last year was named the world’s first platinum-badged Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design auto assembly factory. Enterprise South industrial park, which holds VW, a handful of its suppliers and an Amazon distribution center, was created from a polluted former U.S. Army ammunition production plant. The city also has 35 miles of linear greenways and trails, including the 11-mile Tennessee Riverwalk which runs to downtown.

Solar Schools: Powering classrooms, empowering communities.

Solar Schools from NRDC on Vimeo.

The Solar Schools platform will help parents and students connect and organize themselves around development of specific solar projects that increase renewable energy infrastructure in their community. We are building a bridge that connects local enthusiasm for renewable energy with the experts and resources they need to build the communities they desire.

To help fund, or learn more about this campaign, visit at: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/solar-schools-powering-classrooms-empowering-communities

TVA launches community solar initiative

The Tennessee Valley Authority has recently developed a community solar initiative designed to add at least 500 kilowatts of solar energy for their utility and government properties.

TVA issued a request for proposals (RFP) on Aug. 15 to identify community members interested in participating in this Solar Aggregated Value and Education (SAVE) initiative.

This initiative will also provide an opportunity to test the market for the upfront purchase of Renewable Energy Credits, or RECS, that are directly tied to generation from a local solar facility.  RECs represent the property rights to the environmental, social and non-power qualities of renewable electricity generation. RECs are sometimes purchased to meet legislative or regulatory mandates, meet internal goals, support environmental stewardship and other objectives.

The RFP will be handled through a two-stage application process.  The submission deadline for the concept paper proposal will be in November 2013, with the full application due in February 2014 for those selected past the first stage. Final selection of participants is planned for April 2014.

The  SAVE initiative is the first of 11 projects TVA is launching as part of  a Clean Air Agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that support TVA’s vision for low-cost and cleaner energy.

The innovative approach tries to provide renewable credits and tax breaks for industry, the chance for residents to promote more solar power and the opportunity for TVA to get more renewable power to comply with a 2-year-old settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

TVA began soliciting proposals under the new Solar Aggregated Value and Education (SAVE) program last month. Program director Neil Placer said TVA expects to have one or two solar projects added to its grid by 2015.

Original article here

Brightfield One Opens Oct. 6th

Brightfield One from Restoration Services, Inc. (RSI) on Vimeo.