Archive for October 16, 2013

Start your 2013 ARiES Energy Solar Tour at Wampler’s

Most of our Solar Tour sites are available for visits throughout the month, but Wampler’s Farm Sausage is open to the public one day only – don’t miss your chance to learn and win!

Saturday, October 19 from 11am to 2pm at Wampler’s Farm Sausage 

 

We can’t think of a better way to start your tour of the future of distributed power than with Wampler’s Farm Sausage.

Wampler’s Farm Sausage, a sausage company in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, has been setting the pace and leading us towards energy independence and a cleaner, healthier future for the generations to come. Wampler’s started with a small 30-kilowatt (kW) solar PV system and leveraged that success into a 500 kW solar PV system. The confidence and success of these two investments have helped Wampler’s decision to install the world’s first Proton Power CHyP system!
 
Ted Wampler, Jr., President of Wampler’s Farm Sausage, will be on-site for the kick off of ARiES Energy’s 2013 Solar Tour. He will share with you about the company’s exciting, profitable journey to energy independence and a cleaner, safer future for your children.

Domains for Sale by Owner

www.tvasolar.com, www.tvasolarpower.com, www.greentva.com, and seven other TLD’s in Portfolio. If interested in acquiring, contact Jim Hackworth at (865)250-2639, or e-mail at jim@jimhackworth.com

Solar Shines in Knoxville on November 2nd Solar Tour

Come out to the 2013 Solar Tour

Knoxville residents and businesses considering solar have an opportunity to learn more at the TN Solar Energy Association’s third annual solar tour on November 2, 2013.

The Tennessee Solar Energy Association (TSEA) in collaboration with the City of Knoxville is holding a discussion on solar for your home or business in the public meeting room of the Knoxville Transit Center. The meeting location will be 301 E Church Ave. First 35 to arrive will be seated on the bus. The remaining participants will be able to car pool and follow the bus on its route. The event will begin at 8:30 am and conclude at 3:00 pm.

At 10 am the bus tour will begin. The following 5 sites will be viewed: the Civic Coliseum parking garage, new solar installations at UT, Calhouns at Turkey Creek, a unique solar roofed subdivision, and a solar array at the Bearden Beer Garden. Participants will be able to dismount the bus and ask questions at each site.

The tour will return to the Knoxville Transit Center at 3:00 PM. A handout will be provided which contains a listing and description of the stops on departure. If after the tour you want more information on solar energy for your home or business, contact steve@tnsolarenergy.org.

The Tennessee Solar Energy Association is a non-profit charter- member of the American Solar Energy Society (ASES). We are dedicated to educating Tennesseans about the many unique benefits of using solar energy. We believe that widespread adoption of solar technology in the state of Tennessee will help create energy independence, lessen harmful environmental impacts, and result in cost savings for consumers.

Japan Next-Generation Farmers Cultivate Crops and Solar Energy

Farmers in Japan can now generate solar electricity while growing crops on the same farmland. This co-existence or double-generation is known as “Solar Sharing” in Japan. The concept was originally developed by Akira Nagashima in 2004, who was a retired agricultural machinery engineer who later studied biology and learned the “light saturation point.” The rate of photosynthesis increases as the irradiance level is increased; however at one point, any further increase in the amount of light that strikes the plant does not cause any increase to the rate of photosynthesis.

By knowing that too much sun won’t help further growth of plants, Nagashima came up with the idea to combine PV systems and farming. He devised and originally patented special structure, which is much like a pergola in a garden. He created a couple of testing fields with different shading rates and different crops. The structures he created are made of pipes and rows of PV panels, which are arranged with certain intervals to allow enough sunlight to hit the ground for photosynthesis.

Based on the tests conducted at his solar testing sites in Chiba Prefecture, he recommends about 32% shading rate for a farmland space to reach adequate growth of crops. In other words, there is twice as much empty space for each PV module installed. Takazawa installed 348 PV panels on a small 750 square-meter of farmland. PV panels are installed on pipes, which are 3-meter high from the ground. Rows of PV panels are installed every 5 meters. Under the PV system, Takasawa’s father has been cultivating peanuts, yams, eggplants, cucumbers, tomatoes, and taros and will cultivate cabbages during the winter. These vegetables are sold at a nearby street and consumed by his neighbors.

Many have questioned stability and durability of the PV structure for solar shared family. Nagashima stated that his systems, which are made of thin pipes without concrete footings, even withstood strong winds and earthquakes during the Fukushima Tsunami disasters in 2011. These systems are extremely lightweight and installation of PV panels are spaced out, allowing air to flow through between the panels. This will eliminate concern that the panels will receive wind load and be blown away, therefore, reducing the need for complicated and expensive mounting hardware.