Archive for October 28, 2013

Solar Schools: Powering classrooms, empowering communities.

Solar Schools from NRDC on Vimeo.

The Solar Schools platform will help parents and students connect and organize themselves around development of specific solar projects that increase renewable energy infrastructure in their community. We are building a bridge that connects local enthusiasm for renewable energy with the experts and resources they need to build the communities they desire.

To help fund, or learn more about this campaign, visit at: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/solar-schools-powering-classrooms-empowering-communities

4 Factors Driving the Marriage of Solar and Energy Storage

A solar-powered microgrid demonstrates the potential of coupling big batteries with commercial solar. What if you could finance the energy storage equipment, much the way solar panels are financed, and the batteries provided a revenue stream? Modern grid-scale battery systems are only put in place to save money or provide services to the grid. An example is one installation that includes 402 kilowatts’ worth of solar canopies in the parking lot and, in a twist that differentiates it from most commercial solar projects, a shipping-container-sized battery from startup Solar Grid Storage. Here in Knoxville we have a battery enhanced solar powered car-charging station located at the EPRI location off Dutchtown Road. On a daily basis, though, the battery will deliver frequency regulation services to the local wholesale grid. By providing quick bursts of power to keep a steady balance between supply and demand, battery owner Solar Grid Storage will earn money that is normally paid to natural gas power plant operators.

Here are the factors that are driving the combination of commercial solar and energy storage.

1. The technology is there. Better batteries are in development that will lower cost.

2. The economics can make sense. AES Energy Storage, for instance, provides frequency regulation services at a wind farm in West Virginia, buffered by a 32-megawatt lithium-ion battery bank. Revenue comes from reducing demand charges by using stored energy during peak hours. Most of its customers are in California, which has subsidies for distributed energy storage. By contrast, the desire to have emergency power has become a priority in East Coast states hit hard by Hurricane Sandy and other severe storms.

3. Solar installers want storage — if it pencils out. Military bases and island locations that rely on diesel generators are obvious candidates. A battery can smooth out the flow of power that panels provide to the local grid and address issues, such as the drops in voltage that come when clouds pass over. Batteries could also enable solar installations in places, such as farms, which would have required costly upgrades to the grid infrastructure. The contracts to finance a combined solar and storage system are complex and need to become more standardized, as power purchase agreements are, said president Scott Wiater of Standard Solar. Financing these types of systems is still relatively new and developers need to find customers willing to try not only solar, but also relatively new energy storage technology.

4. NRG Energy Inc. and Exelon Corp.’s Constellation unit say interest in combining solar power with battery storage has soared in the year since Hurricane Sandy knocked out power to millions of homes and businesses on the East Coast. They are among more than a dozen solar providers that have introduced or enhanced in the past year systems that combine rooftop solar panels that generate power and batteries that retain electricity to use later.
People with solar-powered homes and businesses were frustrated to discover that losing power from local utilities also knocked out the inverters that connect rooftop panels to the grid, leaving them unable to tap the electricity they were producing. Adding battery storage solves that problem, said Tom Doyle, chief executive officer of NRG’s solar unit.

It’s also a growing threat to utilities.
“When Sandy came along we really didn’t have a product to keep solar power flowing during blackouts,” Doyle said in an interview yesterday at the Solar Power International conference in Chicago. “Now we can install systems that continue operating when the grid fails, and the costs are coming down.”
Battery storage can add more than 20 percent to the cost of a typical 10-kilowatt solar system for a four-bedroom home, Brendon Quinlivan, director of solar development at Constellation, said in an interview.

original article can be found at: http://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/three-factors-driving-the-marriage-of-solar-and-energy-storage and http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-10-23/nrg-and-exelon-see-batteries-spurring-demand-for-solar.html

Tennessee receives $5M for solar energy

Tennessee has received $5 million to support research and development of solar energy from the U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot Initiative.
The funding is part of a $60 million investment in the initiative, which is designed to lower the cost of solar electricity, advance grid integration of solar energy systems and support the growth of the solar energy workforce in the country.
According to a DOE statement, the solar industry has created nearly 20,000 new jobs. An estimated 119,000 people are employed at 5,000 solar energy companies across the U.S. The funding will help provide training for engineers, utility workers and for students.

em>original article

residential solar installations is stronger and broader than expected

Study Says Most Americans Would Consider Residential Solar. A study from research firm Market Strategies International finds that interest in residential solar installations is stronger and broader than expected among American consumers, even when those consumers are educated on associated costs. With few exceptions, this interest is strong across virtually all age and income groups.

Survey participants were informed that, “The cost of a typical home solar system is about $30,000 and provides about 60% of a home’s electricity needs. The final costs of a solar system can be reduced through a federal tax credit that allows purchasers to deduct 30% of the systems’ cost from their income taxes. Some states also provide financial incentives for solar installations.”

According to the survey, the information made 51% of respondents more interested in home solar systems, with consumers older than 55, again, the only group to show less interest. A majority of respondents across every income group continued to show interest – even low-income households with incomes under $25,000.

“It’s pretty clear that most utilities in the U.S. have to figure out an effective strategy for working with their customers who want solar power,” says Jack Lloyd, senior vice president of energy at Market Strategies. “Companies will take different approaches in adapting to the situation, but rooftop solar appears to be poised to move beyond its early adopter niche and become a more mainstream phenomenon.”

original article: http://www.solarindustrymag.com/e107_plugins/content/content.php?content.13353#utm_medium=email&utm_source=LNH+10-18-2013&utm_campaign=SIM+News+Headlines

Start your 2013 ARiES Energy Solar Tour at Wampler’s

Most of our Solar Tour sites are available for visits throughout the month, but Wampler’s Farm Sausage is open to the public one day only – don’t miss your chance to learn and win!

Saturday, October 19 from 11am to 2pm at Wampler’s Farm Sausage 

 

We can’t think of a better way to start your tour of the future of distributed power than with Wampler’s Farm Sausage.

Wampler’s Farm Sausage, a sausage company in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, has been setting the pace and leading us towards energy independence and a cleaner, healthier future for the generations to come. Wampler’s started with a small 30-kilowatt (kW) solar PV system and leveraged that success into a 500 kW solar PV system. The confidence and success of these two investments have helped Wampler’s decision to install the world’s first Proton Power CHyP system!
 
Ted Wampler, Jr., President of Wampler’s Farm Sausage, will be on-site for the kick off of ARiES Energy’s 2013 Solar Tour. He will share with you about the company’s exciting, profitable journey to energy independence and a cleaner, safer future for your children.

Domains for Sale by Owner

www.tvasolar.com, www.tvasolarpower.com, www.greentva.com, and seven other TLD’s in Portfolio. If interested in acquiring, contact Jim Hackworth at (865)250-2639, or e-mail at jim@jimhackworth.com

Solar Shines in Knoxville on November 2nd Solar Tour

Come out to the 2013 Solar Tour

Knoxville residents and businesses considering solar have an opportunity to learn more at the TN Solar Energy Association’s third annual solar tour on November 2, 2013.

The Tennessee Solar Energy Association (TSEA) in collaboration with the City of Knoxville is holding a discussion on solar for your home or business in the public meeting room of the Knoxville Transit Center. The meeting location will be 301 E Church Ave. First 35 to arrive will be seated on the bus. The remaining participants will be able to car pool and follow the bus on its route. The event will begin at 8:30 am and conclude at 3:00 pm.

At 10 am the bus tour will begin. The following 5 sites will be viewed: the Civic Coliseum parking garage, new solar installations at UT, Calhouns at Turkey Creek, a unique solar roofed subdivision, and a solar array at the Bearden Beer Garden. Participants will be able to dismount the bus and ask questions at each site.

The tour will return to the Knoxville Transit Center at 3:00 PM. A handout will be provided which contains a listing and description of the stops on departure. If after the tour you want more information on solar energy for your home or business, contact steve@tnsolarenergy.org.

The Tennessee Solar Energy Association is a non-profit charter- member of the American Solar Energy Society (ASES). We are dedicated to educating Tennesseans about the many unique benefits of using solar energy. We believe that widespread adoption of solar technology in the state of Tennessee will help create energy independence, lessen harmful environmental impacts, and result in cost savings for consumers.

Japan Next-Generation Farmers Cultivate Crops and Solar Energy

Farmers in Japan can now generate solar electricity while growing crops on the same farmland. This co-existence or double-generation is known as “Solar Sharing” in Japan. The concept was originally developed by Akira Nagashima in 2004, who was a retired agricultural machinery engineer who later studied biology and learned the “light saturation point.” The rate of photosynthesis increases as the irradiance level is increased; however at one point, any further increase in the amount of light that strikes the plant does not cause any increase to the rate of photosynthesis.

By knowing that too much sun won’t help further growth of plants, Nagashima came up with the idea to combine PV systems and farming. He devised and originally patented special structure, which is much like a pergola in a garden. He created a couple of testing fields with different shading rates and different crops. The structures he created are made of pipes and rows of PV panels, which are arranged with certain intervals to allow enough sunlight to hit the ground for photosynthesis.

Based on the tests conducted at his solar testing sites in Chiba Prefecture, he recommends about 32% shading rate for a farmland space to reach adequate growth of crops. In other words, there is twice as much empty space for each PV module installed. Takazawa installed 348 PV panels on a small 750 square-meter of farmland. PV panels are installed on pipes, which are 3-meter high from the ground. Rows of PV panels are installed every 5 meters. Under the PV system, Takasawa’s father has been cultivating peanuts, yams, eggplants, cucumbers, tomatoes, and taros and will cultivate cabbages during the winter. These vegetables are sold at a nearby street and consumed by his neighbors.

Many have questioned stability and durability of the PV structure for solar shared family. Nagashima stated that his systems, which are made of thin pipes without concrete footings, even withstood strong winds and earthquakes during the Fukushima Tsunami disasters in 2011. These systems are extremely lightweight and installation of PV panels are spaced out, allowing air to flow through between the panels. This will eliminate concern that the panels will receive wind load and be blown away, therefore, reducing the need for complicated and expensive mounting hardware.

The Volkswagen XL1 made its U.S. debut at the Chattanooga Convention Center today.

[""
The Volkswagen XL1, the most fuel-efficient and aerodynamic production car in the world, made its U.S. debut at the 23rd Annual Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ) Conference at the Chattanooga Convention Center today. The XL1 offers an estimated European combined fuel consumption rating of 261 mpg (more than 200 mpg estimated in the U.S. cycle) and can cover up to 32 miles as a zero-emissions vehicle in all-electric mode.
“The XL1 offers a glimpse into Volkswagen’s present and future eco-mobility capabilities, and highlights the ultimate successes of ‘Thinking Blue,’” said Oliver Schmidt, General Manager of the Engineering and Environmental Office (EEO), Volkswagen Group of America, Inc. “Volkswagen is proud to debut this ultra-fuel-efficient vehicle before the Society of Environmental Journalists, a group that shares in our commitment to environmental stewardship.”
In addition to the XL1 display, Volkswagen’s participation in the SEJ Conference included a tour of its LEED® Platinum-certified Chattanooga manufacturing plant and solar park; test-drives in its line of eco-friendly cars, such as the e-Golf, Passat TDI Clean Diesel and Jetta Hybrid; and a bird-watching expedition on Volkswagen Chattanooga’s sanctuary grounds.

2013 ARiES Energy Solar Tour Starts 10/5

ARiES Energy would like to invite you to participate in the 2013 ARiES Energy Solar Tour, part of the American Solar Energy Society’s National Solar Tour event. The event runs most of the month of October so you can pick which day works best for you.

Check out the Solar Tour map and visit the locations! Take a picture of the solar system and tag the picture for a chance to win one of our many prizes! 

Visit the ARiES Energy website for the map and more info:

http://www.ariesenergy.com/2013-aries-energy-solar-tour.html